Fixed Football Goals - Boxed, tapered and what you need to know before installing

Fixed in Ground / Stadium / Professional Football Goals

Fixed goals are a specialised structure that need to follow FIFA rules and be insured to correct standards. Comprising of two vertical posts joined by one long horizontal post and a net in white colour. The goal face is made by joining the net to the posts and pulling it back in a box or tapered fashion.

Key article points:

  1. What to consider when buying a fixed goal
  2. Full size soccer goal shapes
  3. Government rules and regulations
  4. Pros and cons of fixed soccer goals
  5. Alternatives

Important rules you need to understand when considering a fixed soccer goal: Size, Safety and Maintenance

Fixed soccer goals are to be at the correct size for the intended game. In most cases, it is the standard full-size soccer goal that is needed. For outdoor/stadiums and professional soccer, the FIFA Approved full-size goal is 2.44m x 7.32m (8ft x 24ft) measured from the inside edge. While the depth doesn’t have a FIFA requirement, it is usually between 1.5m to 2.5m. Thickness of the posts are not to be more than 12cm, and should be equal in size and shape (square, rectangle, circle, oval).

Fixed goal on a soccer field. How are fixed soccer goals used and when do you need to use them? There are rules to how you used soccer goals for your club, home and school. We discuss what you need to know about fixed soccer goals and what alturnatives there are.

What are box soccer goals? Who uses this type of goal?

Box goal is a considered the premier goal shape and used for international games. When you see the Socceroos, English Premier League or FIFA game, you will see a box goal. It has the front two posts with two more posts behind holding the net in a cube shape. This makes a very open style goal.

What are tapered soccer goals? Why should I consider these type of soccer goals?

A Tapered goal is very similar, but doesn’t have the rear poles to open the back of the goal. It tends to drape down from the front posts to create triangular shape. Sometimes there is a post that comes out the back of the vertical poles to allow a deeper taper, but the overall shape is similar. There is nothing wrong with this goal, but is usually used in clubs, schools and parks as it is cheaper and easier to produce.

Make sure you are aware of government standards on safety of goals. Large/heavy goals need to comply with a range of rules otherwise risk not being fit for use. Any goal that doesn’t follow these rules is considered dangerous and a liability. Read this for further info on goal regulations.

While we recommend fixed goals where needed – parks, clubs, stadiums and schools – there are some things to keep in mind. There is continual upkeep of the net, attachments, safety of the structure and the wear on the grass/turf/pitch. We are finding clubs, schools and associations turning to portable goals to minimise cost and issues associated with fixed goals.

A fixed soccer goal can have issues with dead grass zones, with many council fields now having areas of no-use because it has turned into a dust or mud zone. Having the nets stay up 100% of the time comes with the challenges of weather, wear and vandalism.

A club that has curated grounds will always have fixed goals in place - Senior teams will need to use standardised FIFA goals sizes for matches. But a lot of clubs are now using portable goals outside of matches to reduce wear on turf, allow for better training, speed and ease of use. For example, there is the Full Sized Bownet goal for any club wanting an alternative as it can be packed up and put away at the end of the day – simple.

Suggested goals & nets:

 

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